I'm really excited about this event because I know how big the hearts are of The Lake listeners and you guys always come in clutch for the kids.

We've teamed up with Dwanna's Closet and Food For Thought to help with their holiday food drive this Saturday from 11:00am to 1:00pm at Market Basket on Lake Street.

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Food For Thought is an organization that helps feed Calcasieu Parish students that are food deficient. That means they don't have food to eat at night and on the weekends. Currently, Food For Thought is feeding over 400 kids, however, statistics show them that there are actually 800-1000 kids that are in need of their services. That's why they need our help.

This Saturday you can bring both food and/or monetary donations for the kids that need our help. The kids in need range from very small children to teenagers. So, in my opinion, the best thing to do is to have in mind what age child you want to donate for. Think about what foods they would like and also what foods they're capable to prepare for themselves.

  • Date: Saturday, December 11
  • Time: 11:00am - 1:00pm
  • Location: Market Basket on Lake Street

After the food drive donation event, Food For Thought will process the food and prepare bags to deliver to participating local schools weekly.

If your child or a family member could benefit from this program, ask your school if they participate in the Food For Thought Program. If they do, the administrator will only need to know your child's age to get them the correct food bag for their age group. If the school isn't participating in the program and would like to join, they can connect Food For Thought with the information below:

  • Website: www.swlafoodforthought.org
  • Email: swlafoodforthought@gmail.com
  • Phone: 337-274-6629

Please tell your family and friends about this holiday food drive and let's bless kids all over SWLA and fill up the shelves at Food For Thought.

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