This summer when you're strolling down the breakfast aisle you'll notice that your favorite pancake mix and syrup has a new name.

Following the Black Lives Matter protests last year, PepsiCo., whom owns Aunt Jemima, announced they would be changing the name and logo since the history of it tied back to slavery. On Tuesday, the company revealed the rebrand of their product: Pearl Milling Company. So where did this name come from?

Pearl Milling Company was founded in 1888 in St. Joseph, Missouri, and was the originator of the iconic self-rising pancake mix that would later become known as Aunt Jemima.

PepsiCo. went on to say that in 1925 the Quaker Oats Company purchased the Aunt Jemima brand and over the years updated the look to remove racial connotations. But last June, made the decision to completely remove the image and name. During this time, Quaker consulted with "consumers, employees, external cultural and subject-matter experts, and diverse agency partners" to make sure the rebrand was inclusive.

In addition to the name change, the new logo will reflect the building of the Pearl Milling Company. Finding the product won't be hard, though, because it will still be in the same red packaging. The new rollout will begin around June.

PepsiCo, Inc.

In honor of the launch, Pearl Milling Company will also announce details of a $1 million donation going towards Black female empowerment. The community is invited to suggest and nominate charities that can benefit from this donation. PepsiCo. has also committed to a $400 million contribution over the next five years to "uplift Black businesses and communities."

You can see a history of the Aunt Jemima brand here and how it has evolved over the last 130+ years.

I did notice some people on social media whining about the change and threatening to "no longer be a customer." Really?! It's the same exact taste minus the racial insensitivity how can this possibly affect your life? Excuse me, while I go make some blueberry pancakes and sip my tea.

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